The camera has now recorded a full year of life on Earth from its orbit at Lagrange point 1, approximately 1 million miles from Earth, where it is balanced between the gravity of our home planet and the sun. EPIC is aboard NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, from where it photographs the full sunlit side of Earth every day, giving it a unique view of total solar eclipses.

Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR; formerly known as Triana, unofficially known as GoreSat) is a NOAA space weather, space climate, and Earth observation satellite.It was launched by SpaceX on a Falcon 9 launch vehicle on February 11, 2015, from Cape Canaveral. Accessed July 20, 2015. In 2016, a strange light was spotted near Earth on the NASA live feed. The animation above was assembled from 13 images acquired on March 9, 2016, by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four-megapixel charge-coupled device (CCD) and Cassegrain telescope on the DSCOVR satellite. The camera is focused on … The color images of Earth from NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) are generated by combining three separate images to create a photographic-quality image.
On July 20, 2015, NASA released to the world the first image of the sunlit side of Earth captured by the space agency's EPIC camera on NOAA's DSCOVR satellite. From a million miles out in space, NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) captured images of the moon’s shadow crossing over North America on Aug. 21, 2017. Materials published by the NASA EPIC Team, including imagery, are freely available for re-production or re-use, including commercial purposes. Accessed July 20, 2015. For further information on the NASA media usage guidelines, please visit The color images of Earth from NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) are generated by combining three separate images to create a photographic-quality image. The camera is looking forward at an angle so that the International Docking Adapter 2 (IDA2) is visible. It is mounted on the External Payload Facility of the European Space Agency’s Columbus module. NASA (2015, January 7) NOAA’s DSCOVR to Provide “EPIC” Views of Earth.


A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away. It's one "EPIC" eclipse view: NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera, aka EPIC, recorded the moon's shadow crossing the United States yesterday (Aug. 21) … We ask that the NASA EPIC Team be given credit for the original materials.

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away. The color images of Earth from NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) are generated by combining three separate images to create a photographic-quality image.

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away. No one from the space agency has commented yet on what it could be, but it isn't the first time something like this has happened. High Definition Earth-Viewing System (HDEV) Currently, live views from the ISS are streaming from an external camera mounted on the ISS module called Node 2. EPIC provides 10 narrow band spectral images of the entire sunlit face of Earth using a 2048x2048 pixel CCD (Charge Coupled Device) detector coupled to a 30-cm aperture Cassegrain telescope (Figure 1). The camera … Daily natural color imagery of Earth from the EPIC camera onboard the DSCOVR spacecraft. The camera …

NASA (2015, July 20) NASA Satellite Camera Provides “EPIC” View of Earth . The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. EPIC (Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera) is a 10-channel spectroradiometer (317 – 780 nm) onboard NOAA’s DSCOVR (Deep Space Climate Observatory) spacecraft.